FMS

3 mobility drills all lifters should be doing

If you're serious about increasing your fitness and staying pain- and injury-free, you have a few options.

1) Watch all the mobility exercises flying across your Instagram feed, pick a few of them randomly, do them and hope they help. Not the best strategy, unless you enjoy wasting time doing exercises that may or may not be beneficial to you.

2) Make an appointment with a professional trainer who is qualified to assess movement. You would then undergo a movement assessment and receive a customized corrective exercise program. In most cases, such a qualified professional can narrow your prehab and mobility work down to 10-12 minutes of exercises that, if performed consistently and progressed properly, can improve your movement patterns and create a strong, stable based to support your fitness activities. 

(Wait, what? Your gym/trainer doesn't perform any assessments when a person comes to train with them? Run, don't walk, out the door. Just be sure to perform some ankle mobility drills and calf activations first.)

3) If you're new to movement assessments and corrective exercise and don't really know where to begin, Dr. John Rusin has done all the work for you. He's combined some of the best ideas about human movement into three catch-all mobility drills that address the vast majority of problems we see in the fitness population: hip and adductor tightness, poor thoracic spine mobility and an inability to brace the core pillar and co-contract around the joints to create stability.

You can read all about and watch these go-to mobility drills ===> here.

The best part about these drills is that each one addresses multiple mobility restrictions and trouble spots by incorporating movement. Unlike your garden variety static stretches that you see the Guy With The Giant Biceps doing for hours at your local fitness chain, these drills combine mobility with core stiffness and movement -- which is exactly what your body needs when you lift weights, play sports or perform a conditioning workout.

Here's a great example, which combines a corrective exercise popularized by Functional Movement Systems (which we use to guide our programming at Max Velocity) and renowned baseball trainer Eric Cressey (whose methods we follow religiously in training our young baseball players).

Save yourself some time and try these simple, easy-to-perform mobility drills and let us know in the comments what differences you see in your training. And if you need help, or would like to receive a complimentary movement screen by a certified FMS professional, make an appointment here.

The correct way to fix tight hamstrings

The correct way to fix tight hamstrings

Back Pain? It's time to address your tight hamstrings. But avoid the standard rounded-back toe-touches that most people are doing. Try these safer, more effective hamstring stretches and mobility drills instead.